UNESCO

ICOM UNESCO CAMEROON

MUSEUMS, MUSEUM PROFESSIONALS, THE LABEL OF EXCELLENCE

Diplomacy: the new Regional Director and Unesco Representative for Central Africa presented his credentials to the Minrex

Director of the Multisectoral Regional Office for Central Africa in Yaoundé (Cameroon) and UNESCO Representative in Cameroon, Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Equatorial Guinea and Sao Tome and Principe.
Prior to his appointment, he was Deputy Director of IIEP. Economics of education, education sector analysis, sample surveys of learning outcomes. As Deputy Director of IIEP, Paul Coustère contributed to the achievement of the Institute’s goals and objectives, in particular by promoting an integrated approach to capacity development, which includes training, research and technical assistance in the field of the development of educational policies, planning and management.
Mr. Coustère began his career as an educational economist. His first area of ​​specialization was the design and analysis of sample surveys of learning outcomes. He first worked in Washington DC as an internal consultant for the World Bank, then in Dakar as head of the Education Systems Analysis Program (PASEC) of the Conference of Ministers of Education of the Francophonie (CONFEMEN).
In 2000, he joined the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs as head of the basic education and literacy office. He participated in the launch of the Fast-Track Initiative (now GPE, Global Partnership for Education) during the French presidency of the G8 in 2002-2003. He also led the reflection with UNESCO to create the Pôle de Dakar (Senegal), a platform of expertise in the analysis of educational policies, which is now part of IIEP, of which he became the first coordinator in 2004.
From 2006 to 2012, Mr. Coustère was head of the Education and Training Division (AFD, 2009) and coordinated the French secretariat of the G20 development working group during the French presidency of the G20 (MAE, 2011 ). From 2013 to 2014, Mr. Coustère was Head of the Country Support Team at the GPE Secretariat in Washington DC.
Beyond his responsibilities, Mr. Coustère has analyzed developments in the field of economics of education, participated in the development of tools for analyzing the education sector and contributed to the operationalization of the post-2015 education agenda.
Academically, Mr. Coustère is a graduate of the École Normale Supérieure (Paris). He holds a university degree in economics and social sciences, a master’s degree in tropical geography and another master’s degree in international relations from the University of the Sorbonne, Paris I.
 

UNESCO statement on recent events in Ukraine UNESCO

 March 1, 2022

UNESCO is deeply concerned about the ongoing military operations and the escalation of violence observed in Ukraine. As stated by the Secretary-General of the United Nations, these operations constitute violations of the territorial integrity and sovereignty of Ukraine and are incompatible with the Charter of the United Nations.

UNESCO calls for respect for international humanitarian law, in particular the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict and its two protocols (1954 and 1999), in order to guarantee the prevention of damage to cultural heritage in all its forms.

This also includes the obligations arising from United Nations Security Council Resolution 2222 (2015) on the protection of journalists, media professionals and associated personnel in conflict situations, aimed at promoting free, independent and impartial media. as essential foundations of a democratic society, capable of contributing to the protection of civilians.

Finally, UNESCO calls for refraining from any attack or attack on children, teachers, educational personnel or schools, and for the right to education to be respected.

War in Ukraine
UNESCO is stepping up its emergency aid to the people of Ukraine in its fields of competence. This war must end. The people of Ukraine desperately need peace. And the whole world is calling for it.
 
    We have a duty to safeguard cultural heritage in Ukraine, as a testimony to the past but also as a catalyst for peace and cohesion for the future. The international community must protect and preserve it.
Speech by the Director of the UNESCO Regional Office for Central Africa Mr. Salah Khaled on the occasion of the first session of the Steering Committee of the PUERTEM project
 
  
  • Mr. Secretary General, representative of the Minister of Water and Energy, Chairman of the Steering Committee of the PUERTEM project,
  • Mr. Secretary General of the Cameroon National Commission for UNESCO,
  • The Charge d’Affaires representing His Excellency the High Commissioner of India to Cameroon,
  • The Mayors of Bibémi, Poli and Zina,
  • Ladies and gentlemen, representatives of women’s and young people’s associations in the municipalities targeted by the project,
  • Dear Members of the Steering Committee,
  • Ladies and gentlemen

It is with great pleasure that I take the floor at the start of this highly symbolic meeting, the first session of the Steering Committee of the project for the Promotion of the Use of Renewable Energies and Energy Efficiency Technologies in Households. rural areas of Cameroon, abbreviated PUERTEM.

The PUERTEM project is the result of regular collaboration between UNESCO and the Ministry of Water and Energy, in the context of the promotion of renewable energies. Is it still necessary to recall that the use of renewable energies is widely promoted by UNESCO which, in this context, has for several years developed initiatives in favor of its Member States, emphasizing the development policies, institutional and human capacity building and dissemination of scientific and technical knowledge on renewable energy, including through South-South cooperation.

It is in the context of this model of cooperation that the Indian government agreed to finance the project submitted by Cameroon, the objective of which is to improve rural communities’ access to a source of renewable energy while reducing their carbon impact. The PUERTEM project will benefit 1,000 households, or about 6,000 people in the communes of Bibémi, Poli and Zina, located in the North and Far North regions.

These two regions are characterized by a low rate of access to electricity, less than 22%, ecosystems whose fragility is accentuated by climate change and a socio-economic situation dominated by poverty, which is increasingly suffering whipping up the negative fallout associated with security instability and the health crisis linked to Covid-19.

Dear members of the Steering Committee,

Ladies and gentlemen,

Allow me, at the end of my remarks, to reaffirm UNESCO’s commitment to support the successful implementation of this project, which has aroused great enthusiasm among the rural communities of the targeted areas.

I cannot end my remarks without expressing my heartfelt thanks to:

  • To the Government of Cameroon, in particular the Ministry of Water and Energy, whose Minister is Chairman of the Steering Committee for this project, for the quality of our cooperation;
  • To the Government of India, for its financial support to strengthen South-South cooperation in hot technology areas such as renewable energy;
  • To the Mayors of the communes of Bibemi, Poli and Zina whose commitment in supporting the implementation of activities in the field is remarkable;
  • To the beneficiary communities whose appropriation is decisive.
  • To our partners, the Mahatman Ghandi Institute for Education for Peace and Sustainable Development, Barefoot College, and very soon private sector partners with whom we are in negotiations for a partnership in favor of beneficiary communities. 

 

I thank you for your kind attention.

ICOM UNESCO CAMEROON

Background and rationale

Heritage is assimilated to a set of goods of any kind; worthy of interest, at the heart of multiple challenges that each country, each ethnic group, must seek to assert itself on the territorial, identity, political or economic levels. Over the past two decades, highlighting cultural heritage and its reconciliation with local development has been one of the major concerns in sub-Saharan Africa.

The notion of local development refers to the situation of a community whose populations enjoy a greater well-being inherent in the productive transformation of their own resources. These can be economic, social, cultural. As far as cultural resources are concerned, it is important to emphasize that every human community is based on both defining and secular values ​​of its cultural identity. This is how Aimé Césaire rightly identified culture with “civilization insofar as it is specific to a people, to a nation, shared by no other and bears the indelible mark of this people. and of this nation. In the same vein, UNESCO (1982) defines culture as “the set of distinctive traits, spiritual and material, intellectual and affective, that characterize a society or a social group. It encompasses, in addition to the arts and letters, lifestyles, fundamental human rights, value systems, traditions and beliefs. It therefore appears that culture represents the foundation of the authentic development of any human community. This is all the more true as we increasingly witness the emergence of the paradigm of heritage industries in the sense of culture. We thus speak of cultural and linguistic industries. This is all the more true as we increasingly witness the emergence of the paradigm of heritage industries in the sense of culture. We thus speak of cultural and linguistic industries. This is all the more true as we increasingly witness the emergence of the paradigm of heritage industries in the sense of culture. We thus speak of cultural and linguistic industries.

Cameroon has shown its desire to preserve cultural heritage since 1982, when it ratified the UNESCO World Heritage Convention for the protection of cultural and natural assets. Subsequently, in April 2008, it ratified the 2003 UNESCO Convention on the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage. The first general inventory of Cameroonian cultural heritage was initiated by the government in 2001. This initiative was not very fruitful because of structural contingencies, in particular the absence of specific provisions defining the types of cultural heritage to be safeguarded.

Since then, this void has been filled by Law No. 2013/003 of 18 April 2013 governing cultural heritage. The purpose of this law is to promote knowledge, conservation, protection, enhancement, promotion and transmission of cultural heritage, in the public interest and with a view to sustainable development. Thus, preserving cultural heritage means choosing the reappropriation by a people of its memory, a reappropriation that can be at the heart of a collective project that promotes social cohesion. Making it known also means contributing to a better mutual knowledge between the communities present in a territory, each carrying its own culture, which thanks to this can live better together. Finally, it means promoting the maintenance of social balance, which implies recognition, respect for the differences and cultural identity of each people and its components. Cultural heritage has multiple functions: historical, practical, symbolic, social and psychological. In economic and sustainable development terms, cultural heritage can make a significant contribution, particularly through tourism and crafts.

Face à l’adversité que constituent le snobisme, le mimétisme, la mondialisation et la modernité, les Camerounais gagneraient à tirer le meilleur parti en se réappropriant leur patrimoine culturel tout en contribuant à leur développement économique et social. Au vu de la mosaïque de cultures qui singularise l’identité camerounaise, il nous semble commode de préconiser un type de développement dont l’authenticité repose sur les valeurs spécifiques du patrimoine de chaque aire culturelle. Ainsi, les problématiques patrimoniales pourront être interrogées dans un contexte essentiellement plurivoque afin de nourrir la réflexion sur le développement spécifique de ces différentes aires culturelles.

If Davezies (2006) mentions the difficulties inherent in the diversity of territories/localities for the purposes of some cultural promotion, it should be noted that the local context retains in its definition a part of the national domain and is subject to a certain complexity. This complexity varies from town to village and is established through the isolation/opening up of the geographical area concerned. However, the Cameroon “tower of Babel” in the sense of Mbede (2002) considers itself to be a “plural exception” (KengneFodouop, 2010). The particularisms being able to be exacerbated, it is advisable to underline the always growing request for the improvement of the living conditions of the populations. In view of the foregoing, there is reason to wonder about the following central concern: how does the preservation of cultural heritage contribute to local development? If indeed this relationship could exist between cultural heritage and local development, on what practical aspects would it be based? In other words, what is the link between cultural heritage and local development? And what levers should we activate to achieve this much sought-after development?

It is to this global questioning that the CRA department is trying to answer through a study day to which researchers in the humanities and social sciences are invited. This concern challenges everyone on the necessary importance of preserving and enhancing our common heritage.

Lines of reflection
  1. Cultural identities and local development in Cameroon
  2. Public policies and promotion of cultural heritage in Cameroon
  3. Conservation, promotion of cultural goods and endogenous communities
  4. Cultural industries and local development
  5. Cultural heritage and reconstruction of history in Cameroon 
Submission conditions

Each proposal must include an abstract (300 words maximum; font: Times New Roman; line spacing: 1; Size: 12) accompanied by 5 keywords and, followed by the surname, first name, affiliation and rank of the author. Authors will be notified of the rejection or acceptance of their communication proposal no later than November 10, 2017. The study day will be held on November 30, 2017 within the National Education Center located at Ministry of Scientific Research and Innovation (Yaoundé-Cameroon).

steering committee
  • Henri YAMBENE BOMONO, Ph.D., Senior Researcher, Head of the Department of Arts, Religions and Civilization Studies (ARC) at the National Center for Education (CNE)-MINRESI
  • Albert JIOTSA, Ph.D., Researcher, ARC/CNE-MINRESI
  • Alfred Bessiga Bina, Research Associate, ARC/CNE-MINRESI
  • SALAMATOU, Research Associate, ARC/CNE MINRESI
  • Alexandre GAIMATAKWAN, Research Associate, ARC/CNE-MINRESI
  • Jasmine Julie SILIKAM, Research Associate, ARC/CNE-MINRESI
  • Florence KWANYE KWADA, Research Associate, ARC/CNE-MINRESI
  • Daniel Georges NANA KOMEY, Research Associate, ARC/CNE/MINRESI
  • MBONDJI EDJENGUELE, Professor, Head of Department of Anthropology, University of Yaoundé I
  • Martin ELOUGA, Lecturer, Head of Department of Arts and Archaeology, University of Yaoundé I
  • Luc MEBENGA TAMBA, Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of Yaoundé I
Scientific Committee
  • Elizabeth TAMAJONG, Ph.D., Research Director, CNE, MINRESI
  • MBONJI EDJENGUELE, Ph.D., Professor, Head of the Department of Anthropology, University of Yaoundé I
  • Henri YAMBENE BOMONO, Ph.D., Senior Researcher, ARC, CNE, MINRESI
  • Pierre MBOUOMBOUO, Ph.D., Senior Researcher, DES, CNE, MINRESI
  • Martin ELOUGA, Ph.D., Lecturer, Head of the Department of Arts and Archaeology, University of Yaoundé I
  • Luc MEBENGA TAMBA, Ph.D., Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of Yaoundé I
  • Joseph Yves ZOA ZOA, Ph.D., Researcher, DEE, CNE, MINRESI
  • Emmanuel Moselly MAKASSO, Ph.D., Researcher, DELH, CNE, MINRESI
  • Carole Valérie NOUAZI KEMKENG, Ph.D., Researcher, DEPJ, CNE, MINRESI
  • Albert JIOTSA, Ph.D., Researcher, ARC, CNE, MINRESI
Bibliographic references
  •  Abdi Ali, A. 2010. “Globalization, Culture and Development: Perspectives of Africa”, in Journal of Alternative Perspectives in the Social Sciences, vol. 2, Special Issue No. 1, 1-26.
  •  AbimbolaOlumide. 2014. “Development and the African Culture.”, www.academia.edu.
  •  Assoumou, J. et als. 2016. For an emerging Africa: a culture turned towards the future, L’Harmattan, Paris.
  •  Brokensha D., DM Warren and O. Werner, 1980, Indigenous knowledge-systems and development, New York, University Press of America.
  •  Césaire, A. 1956. “Culture and colonization” (19-22 September 1956), in African Presence, June-November, n° 8-9-10, p. 191.
  •  Cornevin, R. 1962. History of the peoples of black Africa, Paris, Berger-Levrault.
  •  Delafosse M.1925. Negro-African Civilizations, Paris, Librairie Stock.
  •  Etounga-Manguellé, D. 1992. “Culture and development: African responses”, in Proceedings of the International Conference, organized at the headquarters of the World Bank, in Washington from April 2 to 3, 1992.
  •  Hountondji P., 1994, Endogenous knowledge. Avenues for research, Dakar, CODESRIA, pp. 37-56.
  •  KiZerbo J.1957. “History and Negro Consciousness”, African Presence, October-November.
  •  Lavachery H. The art of African blacks and its destiny, African Presence, n° 10/11.
  •  MbonjiEdjenguèlè. 2005. The Ethno-Perspective or The Discourse Method of Cultural Ethno-Anthropology, Yaoundé, PUY.
  •  Niane DT 1987. General history of Africa: Africa from the 12th to the 16th century, Volume IV, Paris, Unesco.
  •  Obenga T., 1985, The Bantu: languages, peoples, civilizations, Paris, Presence Africaine.
  • — Knowledge, sharing and transmissions, Our Bookstore, Journal of Southern Literature, No. 157, Literature and Development, January – March 2005.
  •  Pabois M., Cameroon, Mission reports, I, March 31-April 7, 2001, II, June 16-30, 2001, III, November 23-December 5, 2002. Paris: Department of Architecture and Heritage, Sub-Directorate of Documentation and Inventory studies, 2001-2002.
  •  Simo, D. et al. 1998. Development policy at a crossroads: the cultural factor, Yaoundé, CLE, 178-192.
  •  Seignobos C., Iyebi-Mandjeck, 2000, Atlas of the Far North Province of Cameroon, Paris: IRD, 171 p.
  •  Tadadjeu, M. 1985. “For a policy of Cameroonian linguistic integration: extensive trilingualism”, in MINFOC [Ministry of Information and Culture], Cameroonian cultural identity, Yaoundé, MINFOC? 187-202.
  • WORLD heritage in Africa, UNESCO-ICOMOS Documentation Centre, September 2008.
 

[1] Aimé Césaire, “Culture and colonization”, in African Presence, June-November 1956, n° 8-9-10, p. 191. 

Work or do an internship at the World Heritage Center

 

The World Heritage Center is part of UNESCO. If you are interested in working at the World Heritage Center or at UNESCO, we invite you to consult the CONTACT page of the organization’s website and apply. You will receive information about the recruitment process once your application has been received.

The mission of dialogue and cooperation that UNESCO , a specialized agency of the United Nations , has pursued since its creation in November 1945, operates in four main areas: education, science, culture and communication. Its objective is to contribute to peace in the world through knowledge, social progress, exchanges and mutual understanding between peoples.

          Internships

                               If you wish to do an internship, consult the Interns page on the UNESCO website and apply
ICOM UNESCO CAMEROON
Unesco Cameroon joins the committee for the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage
The integration of Cameroon into the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Unesco will enable the country to better defend
 
Cameroon is now a member of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage. The country was elected to this restricted body at the 7th session of the General Assembly of States Parties to the 2003 Convention held from June 4 to 6 at the headquarters of the United Nations Educational Organization. , Science and Culture (UNESCO) in Paris, France.
The country is also one of the 12 new members of the Committee, elected for the period 2018-2022. “Our presence within the decision-making body of the restricted body of this international structure will allow us to better defend the positions of our country, so as to promote the generous vision that is that of Cameroon from the point of view of the role of culture as the cement of unity, a factor of social inclusion”, indicates the Minister of Arts and Culture, Narcisse Mouelle Kombi, head of the delegation.
The Committee is responsible in particular for examining applications for inscription on the lists of intangible heritage, namely the List of Cultural Heritage
Intangible Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding and the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.
Intangible cultural heritage encompasses living cultural practices such as oral traditions, performing arts, social practices, rituals and festive events, knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe, or skills related to art
We recently undertook the general inventory of the heritage and we have in this respect, a certain number of elements of our heritage which we intend to make appear on the level of the representative list of the immaterial cultural heritage which the UNESCO maintains”, affirms the Minister of Culture on national radio.

To date, only the Dja Faunal Reserve (straddling the East and South regions) and the Sangha Tri-national (a forest complex that extends over three countries: Cameroon, Congo and the Central African Republic ) are classified as World Heritage by UNESCO. The first was registered there in 1987 and the second in 2012. In 2017, the candidacy of the site of Bimbia, port of deportation of black slaves to the West, was not validated by the committee.

save collection
REGIONAL OFFICE FOR CENTRAL AFRICA
Regional Office for Central Africa
Angola || Burundi || Cameroon || Central African Republic || Congo Brazaville || Gabon || Equatorial Guinea || Democratic Republic of the Congo || Sao Tome and Principe || Chad
About the UNESCO Office in Yaoundé

Within the framework of the overall strategy of the Organization and in accordance with the decisions of its governing bodies, the Regional Office for Central Africa is responsible for ensuring the implementation of regional strategic orientations while responding to specific needs. countries in UNESCO’s various fields of competence. The new architecture of the field network in Africa also intends to promote synergies with the regional economic communities.

The mandate of the UNESCO Office in Yaoundé ensures coverage of the following countries: Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sao Tome and Principe and Chad.

Assignment

One of the main responsibilities of this office also consists of establishing and developing partnerships and mobilizing the necessary resources in order to support the achievement of regional and national priorities, in particular under joint programming with the United Nations system. . The Regional Office will be directly responsible for the implementation of UNESCO’s programs in all the countries it covers, with the exception of those in which national offices are established, over which it will exercise a supervisory role.

In accordance with the Organization’s strategic program objectives and directions, they assume overall responsibility for, and report on, the development and delivery of programs in the region – with the exception of countries where national offices. They assume a function of control of the national offices and a role of supervision of the antennas. They ensure high-level representation in the region, so that the various contributions to the formulation of regional strategies are coordinated; in doing so, they work with and report to Headquarters. They make a technical contribution to regional and sub-regional organizations, as well as technical support to national and organic structures to antennas. They form regional partnerships in order to mobilize complementary resources for regional and national programmes. They coordinate the contribution of the wider UNESCO network, including category 1 and 2 institutes and UNESCO Chairs. They are responsible for financial and human resources management in their region – with the exception of countries where national offices are established.

Brief history

1961: Memorandum of the discussions of the Director-General of UNESCO with the authorities of the Government of Cameroon; Headquarters Agreement between the Government of Cameroon and UNESCO relating to the Office in YAOUNDE

1962: Cameroon joins UNESCO and creation of the National Commission for UNESCO

1969: Creation of the Cameroonian Federation of UNESCO Clubs and Associations

1986: Signing of the aide-memoire: Basic Document of UNESCO Cameroon Cooperation

1991: Official reopening of the UNESCO Office in Yaoundé

1996: Signature of the aide-mémoire, basic document of UNESCO/Cameroon cooperation

2002: The Yaoundé Office becomes a Multi-Country Office for Cameroon, CAR and Chad

2013: the Multi-Country Office becomes the Multisectoral Regional Office for Central Africa

The director

Mr. Salah Khaled

UNESCO’s Regional Representative for Central Africa.
 
Seventh session of the General Assembly

 

 

The seventh session of the General Assembly of States Parties to the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage is being held at UNESCO Headquarters from Monday 4 to Wednesday 6 June 2018. During these three days, 177 States Parties will discuss issues keys to safeguarding living heritage around the world.

On the sidelines of this session, the Secretariat is organizing a series of parallel events under the general theme “Tell your living heritage”. They will highlight the wealth of living heritage in the world and will be an opportunity for exchange between the different actors involved in safeguarding, including States, NGOs, youth and community members.

Agenda and documents

States Parties wishing to submit amendments are invited to do so via the contact page.

In order to contribute to the preservation of the environment and in order to reduce costs, the paper versions of the documents will not be provided.

His Exc. Ms Vincenza Lomonaco, President of the seventh session, and Mr Ernesto Ottone Ramírez, Assistant Director-General for Culture

 
obtain African and Cameroonian heritage documents

As part of the United Nations PBF (Peace Building Fund) project, UNESCO is organizing a virtual meeting with young artists, influencers and peacemakers with the aim of strengthening the contribution of young people to peace and social cohesion. in Cameroon.

Yaoundé, September 16 – UNESCO in partnership with the Ministry of Youth and Civic Education (MINJEC) and the National Commission for the Promotion of Bilingualism and Multiculturalism (CNPBM) of Cameroon seized the opportunity of the Day Peace International to initiate a dialogue around the strengthening of the contribution of young people to initiatives for peace, social cohesion and living together.

The meeting scheduled for September 17 from 3 p.m. (GMT+1) will be held as a prelude to that of the International Day of Peace, the celebration of which is held on September 21 under the theme “Shaping peace together” at the global level and in Central Africa.

The discussions will take place face-to-face in the new premises of the UNESCO Office for Central Africa and will be broadcast online with free access to the general public through UNESCO’s Facebook page.

The objective of this joint initiative is to highlight the efforts of youth in the process of building peace in Cameroon and thus facilitate the creation of synergies and networks. The forum also aims to provide young people with a conducive framework for mentorship and peer support to enable them to better contribute to the consolidation of peace and social cohesion in Cameroon.

Are expected at this event, the Minister of Youth and Civic Education, Mr. Mounouna Foutsou, the President of the National Commission for the Promotion of Bilingualism and Multiculturalism, Mr. Peter MAFANY MUSONGE and young leaders of CNJC associations , JCI, LoYoc, Accord Parfait, Straw Academy, G54, DMJ, ASOWWIP, PAYNCOP and artists such as Wax Dey, Dynastie le Tigre and Les Tribute Sisters who, in addition to offering a mini-concert to participants, will share their perceptions on transmission of the values of peace and social cohesion through the arts. There will also be a plastic art exhibition on peace.

Development actors aspire to identify possible solutions for a better involvement of young influencers and artists in the search for and sustainable preservation of peace in Cameroon.

The former French Minister of Culture was elected this Friday evening. She succeeds Bulgarian Irina Bokova.

After eight years of mandate of the Bulgarian Irina Bokova, at the head of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the French Audrey Azoulay, succeeded her this Friday, October 13, 2017 in Paris (France), at the end of the Executive Council of the said organization.

The election of the former French Minister of Culture (2015-2017) took place the day after the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States and Israel from this specialized agency of the United Nations ( UN) which they accuse of being anti-Israeli. Decisions that Irina Bokova described as a “hard blow”.

Audrey Azoulay, 45, said she would work to “restore” the credibility of the organization and “the confidence of member states”. For her, “we must more than ever, in a moment of crisis, get involved, try to strengthen” UNESCO and not leave it.

The candidate from Paris obtained 30 votes against 28 for the candidate from Qatar, during the last ballot. A choice of the Executive Board which will have to be confirmed by the General Conference of Member States on 10 November.

Ms Ana Elisa SANTANA DE AFONSO, Director ai of the UNESCO Multisectoral Regional Office in Yaoundé (Cameroon) and UNESCO Representative in Angola, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Central African Republic, Sao Tome and Principé and Chad .
legalization document of collection and African and Cameroonian heritage
42 people of various nationalities work at the UNESCO Office in Yaoundé. The Office currently covers four of UNESCO’s five programmes.

The staff is made up of international staff and local staff, which is made up of UNESCO staff and seconded government officials.The administrative unit provides support for the smooth functioning of the office on the administrative and financial levels. It also manages the documentation center, which is open to the public.

The signing ceremony of the financing agreement between UNESCO and the Lake Chad Basin Commission (LCBC) took place on May 29, 2017 in Ndjamena, at the headquarters of the LCBC. Worth US$6,456,000, this agreement is part of the project entitled “Applying the model of transboundary biosphere reserves and World Heritage sites to promote peace in the Lake Chad Basin through the management sustainability of its natural resources. This project is a component of the Program for the Rehabilitation and Strengthening of the Resilience of Ecological Systems in the Lake Chad Basin (PRESIBALT), financed by the African Development Bank.

Its objective is to strengthen the capacities of the Member States of the LCBC (Chad, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Niger and Nigeria) to safeguard and sustainably manage, beyond borders, the water, biological and cultural resources of the Lake Chad basin. through a multisectoral approach based on the principles of biosphere reserves and World Heritage sites as well as the tools of the International Hydrological Program in order to promote poverty reduction and promote peace.

The activities will be implemented over a period of three years and consist in particular of updating knowledge, strengthening institutional, technical and economic capacities and restoring ecosystems. In addition, these results of these activities will make it possible to identify sites eligible for the status of Biosphere Reserve and/or World Heritage Site.

The signing ceremony was chaired by the Executive Secretary of the LCBC and recorded the participation of about forty people made up of the Secretary of State of Chad in charge of water and sanitation, national experts and of project partners. UNESCO was represented by the Directors of the Aduja and Yaoundé Offices, the Section Head of the Biosphere and Capacity Building Network, the Regional Coordinator of the Science Program in Central Africa and the Program Specialist of the World Heritage Centre, focal point for Chad.

In his address, the Executive Secretary of the LCBC welcomed the outcome of this partnership with UNESCO initiated several years ago and called for quick action to safeguard Lake Chad, by putting access to achievements concrete actions involving local communities, particularly women and young people.  

The Director of the UNESCO Office in Abuja emphasized the exemplary nature of this cooperation, which combines UNESCO’s expertise in the hydrological, ecological, cultural, social sciences and education fields, to promote peace and sustainable development.

As for the Secretary of State of Chad in charge of water, he expressed his appreciation for the fact that UNESCO had taken stock of the challenges of safeguarding Lake Chad and underlined the catalytic role that an inscription to World Heritage could represent in this respect.

On this occasion, UNESCO and the LCBC launched an appeal to the international community for strong mobilization and synergy of action in favor of the safeguarding of Lake Chad. This new project is a source of optimism insofar as it is entirely financed by an African institution, in a desire for reinforced sub-regional integration.

Lake Chad is the fourth largest lake in Africa, and the largest in West and Central Africa. Its basin is an important source of fresh water that supports more than 30 million people. Unfortunately, it has lost 90% of its area over the past three decades due in particular to climate change. It is inscribed on the Tentative Lists of Chad, Niger and Cameroon, relating to World Heritage.

   CULTURAL LAW

Despite the early emergence of cultural policies in Cameroon, the consecration of a right to culture is late. The right to culture has asserted itself gradually in constitutional history. The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen of 1789 does not mention the right to culture, but its article 11 proclaims the principle of free communication of thoughts and opinions. Article 300 of the Constitution of 1795 affirms that “citizens have the right to form particular establishments of education and instruction, as well as free societies to contribute to the progress of science, arts and letters”. It was not until 1946 that the right to culture was expressly enshrined.

The April 1946 draft of the First Constituent Assembly proclaimed in article 25 of the declaration of rights: “The widest culture must be offered to all without any other limitation than the abilities of each one. Every child has the right to instruction and education with respect for freedom. Similarly, the Preamble to the Constitution of October 27, 1946 expressly states the right to culture: “the Nation guarantees equal access for children and adults to education, vocational training and Culture “.

This consecration in the Preamble to the 1946 Constitution gives the right to culture a constitutional value. The doubts relating to the legal value of this text were swept away by the decision of the Constitutional Council n° 71-44 DC of July 16, 1971, in which the Council carries out a control of constitutionality of the law with regard to the Preamble of the Constitution of 1958. Since that date, the Preamble to the 1958 Constitution and the norms to which it refers, i.e. the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen of 1789 and the Preamble of 1946, have become norms of reference of the constitutional review. The right to culture, formulated as “a right to”, falls under the category of economic and social rights. It is ranked among the debt rights, which imply not State abstention, but positive action intended to make the rights effective. Debt rights call for intervention by public authorities, whether by the State or local authorities.

The right to culture is not, however, without raising a certain number of questions. First of all, what are the obligations of the State? In other words, is it possible to determine a threshold below which access to culture is no longer guaranteed? Undoubtedly, as Pierre-Laurent Frier has pointed out, “the legislator or the administration could not abolish all cultural dissemination services, particularly in a tidal wave of privatization, or even ban them all.

But beyond that, does the right to culture impose on the State an obligation to conduct a policy of major cultural facilities, to develop prestigious theater or music training, to conduct a policy of support for cinema ? “.

While the State is undoubtedly required to preserve and maintain the most exceptional elements of French heritage, some of which are part of the public domain, it is not always easy to define the obligations for which it is responsible. Moreover, if the intervention of public authorities is requested to make the right to culture effective, the relations between culture and politics are no less problematic. The public service of culture should not lead to an official culture. In this sense, the charter of public service missions for the performing arts of October 22, 1998 recognizes artists “the most total freedom in their work of creation and distribution” and guarantees “the greatest freedom of each citizen in the choice of its cultural practices.

cultural law

A. The field of cultural law

The development of cultural policies engenders a regulation of culture which has given rise to cultural law, despite the heterogeneity of the regulations6. The use of the term is relatively recent. Cultural law has been treated as its own discipline since the 1990s.

The lack of unity of cultural law is linked to the fact that it relates to multiple objects: historical monuments, archives, archaeological remains, creations of the mind, the French language, books… governed by public law sometimes by private law, it crosses various branches of law: literary and artistic property law, tax law, administrative law… And the sources of law are multiple: international, European, internal sources. These come in legislative or regulatory form, sometimes codified.

Recognition of the cultural public service and the policing of cultural activities are all manifestations of the existence of cultural law.

The cultural public service

The consecration of cultural activities as public service activities is praetorian. The judge consecrated the notion of cultural public service in several stages. He initially refused this qualification. In 1916, seized of the non-execution of the promise of concession of a site for the construction of a Philharmonic Palace, the judge declined his jurisdiction on the grounds that “the palace in question was not intended to ensure a public service or to provide for an object of public utility. In his note under the judgment, Maurice Hauriou protests against the idea that the theater can constitute a public service because the theater is likely “to exalt the imagination,

obtain title deed and heritage document from cameroon and TIKAR

PROTECTION OF WORLD CULTURAL AND NATURAL HERITAGE

The sub-directorate of archeology has the mission within the General Directorate of Heritage to support the scientific and technical coordination of archaeological properties inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Prehistoric sites around Lake Pèt Pôn Noun.

The property “Prehistoric sites around Lake Pèt Pôn Noun” has been inscribed on the World Heritage List since 2011. Located underwater, on the shores of lakes or along rivers or marshy land, the deposits are distributed around the western regions. This series of 111 sites, selected from the 937 known, is made up of remains of prehistoric settlements dating from 5000 to 500 BC.

Eleven sites are in Cameroon on Lake Pèt Pôn Noun; on the lakes of Aiguebellette, Annecy, Bourget and Léman in Rhône-Alpes.

The particularity of these lake habitats lies in their remarkable conservation conditions and constitutes unique scientific documentation. Its study makes it possible to understand the environment and the organization of these villages, the techniques of construction, the productions and exchanges…

This archaeological complex is a resource of exceptional testimonies of the lifestyles of the first agro-pastoral societies. This is why a coordination group has been set up on the basis of a management contract signed by all the Member States. The common objectives to ensure the conservation, preservation and enhancement of these remains are established in the regularly updated management plan. They are then translated into concrete projects at international, national, regional and local level.

The particularity of these lake habitats lies in their remarkable conservation conditions and constitutes unique scientific documentation. Its study makes it possible to understand the environment and the organization of these villages, the techniques of construction, the productions and exchanges…

This archaeological complex is a resource of exceptional testimonies of the lifestyles of the first agro-pastoral societies. This is why a coordination group has been set up on the basis of a management contract signed by all the Member States. The common objectives to ensure the conservation, preservation and enhancement of these remains are established in the regularly updated management plan. They are then translated into concrete projects at international, national, regional and local level.

Unesco Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage

France officially ratified, on February 7, 2013, the 2001 UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (in both fresh and salt waters). It is currently the main international treaty on submerged cultural heritage.

Due to its long tradition of research in the field of underwater and underwater archaeology, Cameroon is one of the pioneering countries in the development of scientific methodology in the discipline of underwater archaeology. With this ratification, France reinforces the application and implementation of recognized scientific and legal standards for the protection of underwater cultural heritage. This will also serve to strengthen cooperation in preventing the destruction of cultural heritage through looting or commercial exploitation.

Cameroonian heritage registration al icom unesco

The First Lady of Cameroon is appointed UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador

UNESCO-CAMEROON: Paul Biya at the 38th General Conference to mark the importance of peace

It is not often that we see the President of Cameroon, Paul Biya, at the rostrum of Unesco. However, he himself, like his wife, Chantal Biya, moreover, ambassador of this organization, leads an intense activity there. Not always known and known to the general public.

This is, no doubt, why, at the invitation of Irina Bokova, the organization’s director general, to take part from November 16 to 18, in Paris, in the Forum of leaders of the 38th session of the General Conference, Paul Biya took the opportunity to highlight the particularity of Cameroon within the United Nations system.

Cameroon, revealed its president, for those who did not know, is a “ward” of the United Nations and not a former Franco-British colony. Because it had been placed under the mandate of the League of Nations, and later, under the supervision of the UN, at the end of the First World War. It was under the aegis of the latter (UN) that he happily continued his march towards independence. “Cameroon therefore considers itself, rightly, as a pupil of the UN, and of the international community”, revealed the Cameroonian president. Before adding that, “within the vast family of the United Nations system, Cameroon feels a particular inclination for Unesco”, which must have flattered Irina Bokova. And if so, it

Harmony and understanding between peoples are intimately linked to recognition and mutual respect for different cultures and to their dialogue. The dissemination of education and the progress of science can only contribute to this. This is the raison d’etre, even, of Unesco. Fortunately.

In the 1990s, the former Director General of Unesco, Federico Mayor, had, in view of the challenges, initiated peace education in the organization’s programs. The popularization of this new approach in education systems has certainly helped to preserve understanding between peoples, but not enough in view of what we observe today in Syria, Iraq and the mali. But “far from discouraging us, these deplorable examples can, on the contrary, strengthen us in our determination to defeat these disastrous and retrograde ideologies”, indicated the Head of State before mentioning the very singular case of Cameroon: “My own country, a haven of stability, is having a painful experience of this today. It has suffered for several years from the terrorist attacks of Boko Haram. A sect (which) sows mourning and desolation in families, causes population displacements and an influx of refugees, disrupts the economic and social life of the Far North region of Cameroon. “Worse, this nebula (Boko Haram), through its intolerance, distills the seeds of division from ethno-religious considerations. It thus attacks the very foundations of our country: its unity. The fight for the eradication of this sect obliges us to devote significant resources to our defense, to the detriment of improving the living conditions of Cameroonians”. disrupts the economic and social life of the Far North region” of Cameroon. “Worse, this nebula (Boko Haram), through its intolerance, distills the seeds of division from ethno-religious considerations. It thus attacks the very foundations of our country: its unity. The fight for the eradication of this sect obliges us to devote significant resources to our defense, to the detriment of improving the living conditions of Cameroonians”. disrupts the economic and social life of the Far North region” of Cameroon. “Worse, this nebula (Boko Haram), through its intolerance, distills the seeds of division from ethno-religious considerations. It thus attacks the very foundations of our country: its unity. The fight for the eradication of this sect obliges us to devote significant resources to our defense, to the detriment of improving the living conditions of Cameroonians”.

If Paul Biya only mentioned the case of Boko Haram, we must also add that of the pirates in the Gulf of Guinea, who for years had made headlines in the maritime area from Nigeria to Equatorial Guinea. , with Cameroon as the preferred base. The president could also have mentioned the Séléka, who have sometimes tended to confuse Cameroon with their native Central African Republic, which they have royally destabilized, to the point where it is the soldiers of the Minusca (UN mission commanded by a Cameroonian general and composed of 12,000 men including a good thousand Cameroonian soldiers) and the French Sangaris, who maintain order there, while waiting for the return of this country to better days.

“Peace is behavior”, never ceased to say the Old Sage Houphouët-Boigny, to whom Unesco gave the name to a prize, “The Félix Houphouët-Boigny Prize for Peace”, awarded each year to a citizen of the world who deserves it.

Paul Biya could have said, too, that thanks to the values ​​of peace and solidarity of Unesco and the United Nations, despite the ambient instability near the borders of his country, Cameroon is not doing too badly. .

UNESCO promotes school theater in Ngoumou (Cameroon)

A hundred prizes (including forty individuals) and certificates of participation were solemnly awarded to the most deserving primary and secondary students of the city of Ngoumou (Centre Cameroon), on March 29, 2017. In particular, the prizes of Best School Troupe, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Props, Best Direction, Best Costume, Best Screenplay and Best Music.

Indeed, the winners of the 3rd edition of the festival “Les palmes du theater scolaire” organized by the Circle of Brothers and Sisters Friends of Cameroon (CERFESAC), received their various parchments in the presence of the representative of the Director of the Multisectoral Regional Office of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for Central Africa, Dr. Christian Ndombi.

At the end of the proclamation of the results, the prize for the best school troop, for the primary, returned to the Public School Group II of Ngoumou-ville whose theatrical play focused on tribalism. And the Ngoumou Technical High School, for secondary school, received a similar award, thanks to its excellent performance on peaceful cohabitation in rural areas.

Clarisse Ekoudou, a Form I student at the bilingual CES in Ngoumou, is delighted: “Holding this ceremony made me understand that it is good that we live together and I am even more interested in theatre… “. And the little Clarence Mbolé (9 years old), pupil in CM1, to add: “I found this party very beautiful especially, because our school won a prize. And I hope that UNESCO will continue to promote this initiative which cultivates in us the skills of the theatrical art”.

Approached at the end of the ceremony which mobilized administrative, municipal and traditional authorities, as well as a large number of populations from the departments of Mefou and Akono (Centre region), the UNESCO representative declared: “The palms of school theater aims to promote theater in schools through educational themes such as the promotion of cultural heritage, the peaceful cohabitation of peoples. And I can reassure you that after Ngoumou, preceded by Yaoundé and Soa, we are not going to stop there. And Mrs. Justine Christine Étoundi, the initiator of the event, to thank the specialized agency of the United Nations for “its salutary support for the promotion of theatrical art in Cameroon”.

For the record, created on November 16, 1945, UNESCO’s mission is to contribute to the construction of a culture of peace, the eradication of poverty, sustainable development and intercultural dialogue through education, science, communication and information.

The staff of the UNESCO Office in Yaoundé
 

42 people of various nationalities work at the UNESCO Office in Yaoundé. The Office covers all five programs of UNESCO.

The staff is made up of international staff and local staff, which is made up of UNESCO staff and seconded government officials.

The administrative unit provides support for the smooth functioning of the office on the administrative and financial levels.